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BEEF FACTOIDS
Creating your own cuts of meat can save you a bundle; besides, YOU get to 100% control the fat content. ALL butcher cuts of Beef can benefit greatly from being dry aged, from a common, inexpensive English Cut Roast all the way up to VERY expensive Prime Rib Roasts and Beef Tenderloins. Below are a few handy Factoids to aid you in purchasing & cooking your “perfect” Beef selections for your family meals: Dry Aging Beef, Prime Rib Roasts, USDA Beef Grades, Beef Tenderloin Roasts, Kobe / Wagyu Beef, Ground Beef, Making your own Homemade Ground Beef, Corn-Fed VS Grass-Fed Beef.
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The Recipes and information contained in these pages are for private use only. They are NOT to be used commercially or published.

BACK TO TOP           DRY AGING BEEF:

ALL beef is "Wet Aged" in one form or another. Primal (untrimmed) cuts are usually packed air-tight in very heavy Cryovac plastic bags by slaughter houses for shipping and storage for extended periods which "counts" only as Wet-Aging time.

The reasons to Dry-Age a quality piece of Beef are MANY.

JUST DO IT - IT WILL BE WELL WORTH THE TRIP!!!!!!

HOW TO DO IT!

Pat the untrimmed Roast dry with paper towels and place it bones down on a wire rack in a shallow pan with a paper towel in the bottom to catch any drippings (change the drippings towel DAILY). Set uncovered in the bottom (coldest) shelf of a refrigerator for 4 to 7 days. Just prior to roasting, thinly shave off any pieces of exterior meat that have become completely dehydrated (REALLY funky looking - Dried areas are perfectly OK). A 6 pound roast will lose over 1/3 pound during this most important aging process.

The meat NEEDS to be kept at a pretty constant 38 degrees during the entire dry aging process.

If you have an extra refrigerator that is not opened very often - PLEASE USE IT, constantly opening and closing a modern refrigerator causes the air-removal and defrosting processes to kick on & off every time the door opens and closes. This causes large changes in internal temperatures - BAD FOR DRY AGING.

If you absolutely CANNOT STAND the fact that there is an exposed piece of meat just sitting in your fridge, you can loosely wrap the meat in a triple layer of cheesecloth. However; DAILY, you must unwrap the cheesecloth, let it dry for 1/2 hour and then re-wrap the meat in order to keep it from sticking and tearing apart the meat fibers too much when you remove it. This piece of cheesecloth WILL get ugly before the process is completed.

BACK TO TOP           PRIME RIB: 

If you are going to spend this much money for a piece of meat, spend a little extra and get the best cut of Beef you can find.

Something called a Prime Rib Roast is the exact same thing as something called a Standing Rib Roast with the only difference being the price, which depends only upon your Butchers attitude towards you.

Coming from the Primal Rib Cut on a Beef Cow - There are two per cow (one on each side).

The Prime Rib you will "normally" cook will contain 7 Ribs. If it is cut into individual rib pieces and the rib bones removed, the cut then magically becomes a Rib-Eye Steak.

Roasting the Prime Rib whole and slicing after cooking gives you a traditional Prime Rib Dinner.

There are two different cuts for Prime Rib (unless you purchase a whole Rib - 14 Ribs).

1) THE FIRST CUT: Also called the Loin End or Small End, is the rear of the section of ribs and has leaner meat and smaller bones. This gives you more meat for your money. The meat and bones get larger as you move forward towards the front shoulder, as does the fat content.

The First Cut is the cut you want to purchase.

2) THE SHOULDER CUT: This cut is from the front of the cut, or near the Shoulder. It is the larger of the cuts with bigger sections of meat which translates into more sinew between the muscles. This cut also has more fat and larger bones.

BACK TO TOP           BEEF GRADES:

BACK TO TOP           The above chart shows the marbling used the USDA to determine the commonly available Beef grades. This chart ranges from the best flavored Beef (Moderately Abundant) to the poorest flavored Beef (Slight). PRIME BEEF: Slightly Abundant to Moderate. CHOICE BEEF: Modest to Small. SELECT BEEF: Slight to Traces (Not Pictured). STANDARD BEEF: Practically Devoid (Not Pictured). WAGYU BEEF: Abundant (Not Pictured) to Moderately Abundant. ALL cuts of Beef are actually graded by the USDA, but they physically “inspect” ONLY a Rib Eye Roast. The marbling of that one roast is used to determine the grade for all of the meat for that ENTIRE COW).

YOUR CHOICES: 

Meat retailers tend to attempt to glorify the meat they sell by giving theirs unique names (Black Angus, etc.) in order to convince their customers that theirs is better than anyone elses. Odds are it isn’t.

1) PRIME: Or Restaurant grade. Search diligently and get your wallet out - this is "THE ONE".

Less than 2% of all beef sold in this country is USDA graded as Prime.

2) CHOICE: While OK, this grade is entirely acceptable if you absolutely cannot find Prime as long as you dry age it.

3) SELECT: Pass this grade by - no matter what. While Prime and Choice Beef are ALWAYS labelled as such, Select may or may not be labelled as to it’s grade AT ALL. If the package isn't labelled as either "Prime" or "Choice", it's a given that it's therefore by default Select Grade.

4) STANDARD: This CA 1800's grade is currently non-existent since today's Cattle Meat is not forced to "toughen up" on those long, hard western cattle drives any more.

BACK TO TOP           BEEF TENDERLOINS:

While relatively low in flavor, but unbelievably tender. Again, if spending this much money, search for a Prime grade roast. If you purchase a whole Beef Tenderloin, it will most likely come in a very heavy plastic bag (Cryovac) and be untrimmed. You need to "prepare" it properly before cooking by trimming.

TRIMMING A TENDERLOIN: 

Remove the tapered Tenderloin from the bag and pat it dry with paper towels. Use your hands to pull off and discard any large pieces of loose fat. Some of the membrane will also peel easily off. As you probe the Tenderloin with your fingers you will discover that there is the main long muscle and a small sinewy, fatty piece that runs the length of the entire Tenderloin. This is called the chain and it is attached most securely at the head (the thicker end) of the Tenderloin. Force your thumb down between the two muscles and slide it end to end to separate them as much as possible before beginning to cut. The chain has some meat, but it is mostly fat and sinew. Trimming away the visible fat and sinew and then slicing the chain very thin will make you the best Philly Cheese Steak you EVER had! To release the chain from the Tenderloin, starting at the narrow end (the tail) and using the tip of your knife and make short, careful strokes between the chain and the Tenderloin. Use your free hand to pull the chain away from the Tenderloin as you cut. Until you reach the head, it should come away very easily. You should only be using your knife to cut through membrane and fat. When you reach the head, be careful about where you cut. The separation between the chain and the main Tenderloin is not so apparent at the head end. Examine the head where the chain is attached and cut the chain away being careful not to cut too much into the good meat of the Tenderloin. There will be a narrow flap of meat left alongside the head of the Tenderloin that is not part of the chain. Flip the Tenderloin over. Begin to cut away the thick chunks of fat by carefully sliding your knife along the length of the Tenderloin (again, use knife strokes that run in the head to tail direction). There is generally a big chunk of fat under the head that should be pulled away. Doing so will create a bit of a flap, but that is normal. After scraping and slicing the most apparent fat away from  the Tenderloin, there will still be some fat that is visible, but removing it would involve digging into the meat, which is not something you want to do. Turn the filet back over and remove the most apparent fat from the top of the Tenderloin. All that should be left to remove now is the long thick membrane that runs about two-thirds of the way down the Tenderloin from the head. This membrane is called the silverskin. This silverskin must be removed. When it is subjected to the heat of the oven, sauté pan or grill, it shrinks and will cause the filet to curl. It is also tough and inedible. Because the silverskin is tough and sinewy it is fairly easy to remove Slide the tip of your knife under a portion of it, starting at the head end, and holding your knife at an angle so that it lightly scrapes the underside of the silverskin (your blade should not be angled in towards the meat), run the blade down the length of the filet, removing the silverskin in long thin strips. When the silverskin has been completely removed, look over the whole Tenderloin and remove any stray bits of fat, sinew and silverskin that remain on the surface. When you are done, you will have a cleaned whole filet. The usable meat can be cut into the center cut filet, the thin tail and the large and oddly-shaped head. I like to use the center cut filet for roasting whole. A roasted center cut filet produces beautiful, uniformly shaped slices that are perfect for serving at formal dinners. A 5 1/2 lb. tenderloin will yield roughly a 2 lb. center cut filet.

BACK TO TOP           KOBE / WAGYU BEEF:

Japanese bred and traditionally raised Kobe Beef comes from the Wagyu Beef Steer. True Kobe Beef is NOT available anywhere in the world but in Japan - Much like the most 'favored" types of Japanese grown Rice's are not available elsewhere. In the U.S.A., the Japanese Black Wagyu cattle were crossbred with Black Angus cattle (1 Wagyu Bull and 20K Angus Cows equals instant giant beef herd). This crossbreed has been named "American Style Kobe Beef". These Steers are NOT raised in the traditional Japanese Kobe way, where they are massaged daily, fed special, secret blends of feed and slaughtered without stress. Still, ours is a very flavorful breed of Steer. This crossbreed is usually sold and served in this country under the true name of "Wagyu Beef". Sometimes, completely erroneously sold by different, unscrupulous wholesalers and restaurateurs, under the false "shortened" name of “Kobe Beef”. There is ABSOLUTELY NOTHING wrong with Wagyu Beef Meat - It is flavorful, tender, well marbled and well worth a celebration dinner with loved your ones. It is DIFFICULT to find in retail butcher shops and if you do find it, be prepared for sticker shock.

BACK TO TOP           GROUND BEEF:

The USDA has laid ground rules for the names that may be used for different types of ground beef.

GROUND BEEF: 70% Lean 30% Fat. Additional Fat may be added to reach the 30% limit. A lot of fat inside. Good flavoring for Taco's, Chili, Spaghetti, etc. where it can be drained after browning.

HAMBURGER: Same as Ground Beef, but CANNOT have any added fat - The fat content is what it is.

GROUND CHUCK: 80~85% Lean, 20~15% Fat. GREAT for hamburgers.

GROUND ROUND: 85~90% Lean, 15~10% Fat. Use in recipes where the hamburger cannot be drained after cooking. Meatloafs, etc.

GROUND SIRLOIN: 90~92% Lean, 10~8% Fat . Lowest in flavor. Good only for weight watching. Needs flavor additives or seasonings.

BACK TO TOP           GRILLING & FRYING A HAMBURGER:

To Grill a GREAT Hamburger: Divide the Ground Beef into equal sized chunks. Shape the each chunk VERY LIGHTLY into a patty. You do NOT want to pack it at all. Once it is shaped into a patty, use your thumbs to press a dent in the top that takes up at least 3/4 of the entire patty's diameter. The dent will make the patty cook up to an even height. Place the patties on the grill grate with the dent up. Grill until nicely charred. Flip each patty over and grill with the grill lid closed until done to your liking. Add Cheese, etc. during the last minute of cooking

NEVER, EVER, AT ANY TIME, PRESS ON TOP OF THE PATTY WITH YOUR SPATULA!!!!!

#1: It squeezes the fat out of the burger which causes flare-ups.

#2: It squeezes the juices out of the burger which GREATLY reduces the flavor.

#3: It stinks and smokes up the back yard.

#4: DO NOT PLAY WITH YOUR GRILLING FOOD! LEAVE IT ALONE!

BACK TO TOP           HOMEMADE HAMBURGER:

Easy and fast and if Charcoal Grilling burgers or making Meat Loaf, well worth the small effort. Making your own has a herd of plusses with the only negative being that it is not as quick as buying it already ground for you (almost though).

#1: YOU DON'T HAVE TO COOK IT UNTIL IT BECOMES SHOE LEATHER!

#2: You get to control the fat content.

#3: You get to control the bone content.

#4: You get to control the scrap meat content.

#5: The home ground texture is to die for.

For 1 pound of Hamburger, purchase an 8 Oz Chuck Roast and an 8 Oz Sirloin Steak. Cut both into 1" cubes, cutting off and discarding any large fat pieces. Place the Chuck Cubes in the Food Processor and pulse 10 times (1+ seconds per pulse). Repeat for the Sirloin Cubes.

NOTE: If making Hamburger for Chili, stop at 6 pulses. If there are any big pieces left after pulsing, discard them as they most likely contain grizzle. Lightly mix the Chuck and Sirloin together with your hands. DO NOT SQUEEZE WHILE MIXING! It is now ready to store covered in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Hamburger made fresh in this way does NOT have to be cooked well done! Medium Rare to Medium makes for a REALLY TASTY hamburger.

Make your patties exactly 5 Oz Each. Lightly shape them so they are about 4 inches in

diameter and 1/2 of an inch thick. Make a shallow dent in the top of each patty so that as

the meat puffs up during cooking, the middle and the edges of each patty end up being the same thickness when done.

Unbreakable Hamburger cooking rules to live by:

#1: NEVER EVER NEVER press on the top of the patty with your Spatula while cooking.

#2: Turn each patty over ONE TIME ONLY! About 4 minutes per side for Medium.

#3: Let the cooked patties stand undisturbed covered with an Aluminum Foil tent for 5 minutes after cooking.

#4: Add any Cheese on the top just before tenting (Add a toothpick to keep the Aluminum Foil from sticking to the Cheese).

BACK TO TOP           BROWNING MEATS:

To effectively brown ANY meat which ends up giving you that much-sought after caramelized, flavorful exterior is NOT difficult to achieve. There are only three hard rules:

#1): Brown over medium high to high heat with as little added oil as possible.

#2): Do NOT crowd the meat in the pan, if necessary, do it in small batches.

#3): Wet meat will NEVER brown, Always pat the meat dry with paper towels before beginning to cook. Blood WILL brown, moisture WILL NOT!

You always want to brown meats that are NOT touching each other in the pan. Crowding the meat causes the meat to steam itself instead of braise itself. Steamed meats are ALWAYS an unappetizing gray color. Braised meats are always GB&D! “Golden Brown and Delicious” - not to mention creating that wonderful "fond" in the bottom of the pan, just WAITING for you to quickly transform it into a multitude of wonderful pan sauces and gravies. Now you know why your ground beef for chili & spaghetti always comes out gray instead of brown.

BACK TO TOP           CORN FED VS GRASS FED BEEF:

It used to be that a steak was a steak was a steak. Today, it's not that simple. A quick glance at the butcher's counter will reveal all kinds of cuts you never knew about along with fancy breeds like Angus, Wagyu and Kobe. Then, just when you thought you came to a decision, you're faced with grass fed vs corn fed beef. Is there actually a difference between these two types of meat, other than the obvious price difference?

GRASS-FED BEEF:

Grass-fed beef is exactly what it sounds like: cattle that have grazed on grassy pastures THEIR ENTIRE LIVES. The first thing you'll notice about this type of beef is its price tag: at my local grocery store, the grass-fed ribeye steak was just shy of $4 more per pound than the corn-fed ribeye. Why is it so much more? Well, it takes longer for grass-fed cattle to reach their processing weight, and they weigh less without grain or corn to bulk up their diet. Raising beef this way is thought to be more sustainable, but it's also more expensive for the rancher. Are those extra dollars worth it? When it comes to nutrition, grass-fed beef is higher in key nutrients, including antioxidants and vitamins. It also has twice as many omega-3 fatty acids as regular beef. As far as flavor goes, this leaner beef has a slightly gamey taste. Because it has less intramuscular fat, it tends to eat a bit meatier than the corn-fed kind, too. Some people describe the texture as chewy, but it's all about how you cook it! Since it has less fat content, it tends to cook faster than regular beef and can easily overcook if you're not careful. We recommend letting grass-fed beef come to room temperature before cooking it to increase the chances of even cooking.

CORN-FED BEEF:

All cattle are started on grass as youngsters, but most of the industry finishes their beef on corn or grain. This quickly bulks the cattle up, increasing the fat to muscle ratio. While this type of diet adds a ton of flavor to your steaks, it's also sort of like feeding candy and cake to cattle; they'll eat their greens if they have to, but they also love filling up on junk food! Since these foods aren't typical feed for cattle, many feedlots end up using preventative antibiotics to keep the herd from getting sick. Most people love the flavor of corn-fed beef, with its buttery, slightly sweet flavor and a texture that most people describe as melt-in-your-mouth tender. It's also more forgiving to cook with its higher fat content. If you love the flavor of corn-fed beef but don't love the additives the cattle are given, look for beef labelled as antibiotic- and hormone-free. Whether you go grass-fed or corn-fed beef, the basic cooking principles apply. Salt it generously before cooking it, and always let your steak rest at least 15 minutes before slicing it.

BACK TO TOP

 

 

=== JUMP TO INFORMATION (CLICK ON UNDERLINED TEXT) === -- DRY AGING BEEF -- PRIME RIB -- USDA BEEF GRADES -- BEEF TENDERLOINS -- -- KOBE / WAGYU BEEF -- GROUND BEEF -- HOMEMADE HAMBURGER MEAT -- -- GRILLING & FRYING HAMBURGER -- BROWNING MEATS -- CORN FED VS GRASS FED --
BEEF FACTOIDS
Creating your own cuts of meat can save you a bundle; besides, YOU get to 100% control the fat content. ALL butcher cuts of Beef can benefit greatly from being dry aged, from a common, inexpensive English Cut Roast all the way up to VERY expensive Prime Rib Roasts and Beef Tenderloins. Below are a few handy Factoids to aid you in purchasing & cooking your “perfect” Beef selections for your family meals: Dry Aging Beef, Prime Rib Roasts, USDA Beef Grades, Beef Tenderloin Roasts, Kobe / Wagyu Beef, Ground Beef, Making your own Homemade Ground Beef, Corn-Fed VS Grass-Fed Beef.
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BACK TO TOP           DRY AGING BEEF:

ALL beef is "Wet Aged" in one form or another. Primal (untrimmed) cuts are usually packed air-tight in very heavy Cryovac plastic bags by slaughter houses for shipping and storage for extended periods which "counts" only as Wet-Aging time.

The reasons to Dry-Age a quality piece of Beef are MANY.

JUST DO IT - IT WILL BE WELL WORTH THE TRIP!!!!!!

HOW TO DO IT!

Pat the untrimmed Roast dry with paper towels and place it bones down on a wire rack in a shallow pan with a paper towel in the bottom to catch any drippings (change the drippings towel DAILY). Set uncovered in the bottom (coldest) shelf of a refrigerator for 4 to 7 days. Just prior to roasting, thinly shave off any pieces of exterior meat that have become completely dehydrated (REALLY funky looking - Dried areas are perfectly OK). A 6 pound roast will lose over 1/3 pound during this most important aging process.

The meat NEEDS to be kept at a pretty constant 38 degrees during the entire dry aging process.

If you have an extra refrigerator that is not opened very often - PLEASE USE IT, constantly opening and closing a modern refrigerator causes the air-removal and defrosting processes to kick on & off every time the door opens and closes. This causes large changes in internal temperatures - BAD FOR DRY AGING.

If you absolutely CANNOT STAND the fact that there is an exposed piece of meat just sitting in your fridge, you can loosely wrap the meat in a triple layer of cheesecloth. However; DAILY, you must unwrap the cheesecloth, let it dry for 1/2 hour and then re- wrap the meat in order to keep it from sticking and tearing apart the meat fibers too much when you remove it. This piece of cheesecloth WILL get ugly before the process is completed.

BACK TO TOP           PRIME RIB: 

If you are going to spend this much money for a piece of meat, spend a little extra and get the best cut of Beef you can find.

Something called a Prime Rib Roast is the exact same thing as something called a Standing Rib Roast with the only difference being the price, which depends only upon your Butchers attitude towards you.

Coming from the Primal Rib Cut on a Beef Cow - There are two per cow (one on each side).

The Prime Rib you will "normally" cook will contain 7 Ribs. If it is cut into individual rib pieces and the rib bones removed, the cut then magically becomes a Rib-Eye Steak.

Roasting the Prime Rib whole and slicing after cooking gives you a traditional Prime Rib Dinner.

There are two different cuts for Prime Rib (unless you purchase a whole Rib - 14 Ribs).

1) THE FIRST CUT: Also called the Loin End or Small End, is the rear of the section of ribs and has leaner meat and smaller bones. This gives you more meat for your money. The meat and bones get larger as you move forward towards the front shoulder, as does the fat content.

The First Cut is the cut you want to purchase.

2) THE SHOULDER CUT: This cut is from the front of the cut, or near the Shoulder. It is the larger of the cuts with bigger sections of meat which translates into more sinew between the muscles. This cut also has more fat and larger bones.

BACK TO TOP           BEEF GRADES:

BBACK TO TOP           The above chart shows the marbling used the USDA to determine the commonly available Beef grades. This chart ranges from the best flavored Beef (Moderately Abundant) to the poorest flavored Beef (Slight). PRIME BEEF: Slightly Abundant to Moderate. CHOICE BEEF: Modest to Small. SELECT BEEF: Slight to Traces (Not Pictured). STANDARD BEEF: Practically Devoid (Not Pictured). WAGYU BEEF: Abundant (Not Pictured) to Moderately Abundant. ALL cuts of Beef are actually graded by the USDA, but they physically “inspect” ONLY a Rib Eye Roast. The marbling of that one roast is used to determine the grade for all of the meat for that ENTIRE COW).

YOUR CHOICES: 

Meat retailers tend to attempt to glorify the meat they sell by giving theirs unique names (Black Angus, etc.) in order to convince their customers that theirs is better than anyone elses. Odds are it isn’t.

1) PRIME: Or Restaurant grade. Search diligently and get your wallet out - this is "THE ONE".

Less than 2% of all beef sold in this country is USDA graded as Prime.

2) CHOICE: While OK, this grade is entirely acceptable if you absolutely cannot find Prime as long as you dry age it.

3) SELECT: Pass this grade by - no matter what. While Prime and Choice Beef are ALWAYS labelled as such, Select may or may not be labelled as to it’s grade AT ALL. If the package isn't labelled as either "Prime" or "Choice", it's a given that it's therefore by default Select Grade.

4) STANDARD: This CA 1800's grade is currently non-existent since today's Cattle Meat is not forced to "toughen up" on those long, hard western cattle drives any more.

BACK TO TOP           BEEF TENDERLOINS:

While relatively low in flavor, but unbelievably tender. Again, if spending this much money, search for a Prime grade roast. If you purchase a whole Beef Tenderloin, it will most likely come in a very heavy plastic bag (Cryovac) and be untrimmed. You need to "prepare" it properly before cooking by trimming.

TRIMMING A TENDERLOIN: 

Remove the tapered Tenderloin from the bag and pat it dry with paper towels. Use your hands to pull off and discard any large pieces of loose fat. Some of the membrane will also peel easily off. As you probe the Tenderloin with your fingers you will discover that there is the main long muscle and a small sinewy, fatty piece that runs the length of the entire Tenderloin. This is called the chain and it is attached most securely at the head (the thicker end) of the Tenderloin. Force your thumb down between the two muscles and slide it end to end to separate them as much as possible before beginning to cut. The chain has some meat, but it is mostly fat and sinew. Trimming away the visible fat and sinew and then slicing the chain very thin will make you the best Philly Cheese Steak you EVER had! To release the chain from the Tenderloin, starting at the narrow end (the tail) and using the tip of your knife and make short, careful strokes between the chain and the Tenderloin. Use your free hand to pull the chain away from the Tenderloin as you cut. Until you reach the head, it should come away very easily. You should only be using your knife to cut through membrane and fat. When you reach the head, be careful about where you cut. The separation between the chain and the main Tenderloin is not so apparent at the head end. Examine the head where the chain is attached and cut the chain away being careful not to cut too much into the good meat of the Tenderloin. There will be a narrow flap of meat left alongside the head of the Tenderloin that is not part of the chain. Flip the Tenderloin over. Begin to cut away the thick chunks of fat by carefully sliding your knife along the length of the Tenderloin (again, use knife strokes that run in the head to tail direction). There is generally a big chunk of fat under the head that should be pulled away. Doing so will create a bit of a flap, but that is normal. After scraping and slicing the most apparent fat away from  the Tenderloin, there will still be some fat that is visible, but removing it would involve digging into the meat, which is not something you want to do. Turn the filet back over and remove the most apparent fat from the top of the Tenderloin. All that should be left to remove now is the long thick membrane that runs about two-thirds of the way down the Tenderloin from the head. This membrane is called the silverskin. This silverskin must be removed. When it is subjected to the heat of the oven, sauté pan or grill, it shrinks and will cause the filet to curl. It is also tough and inedible. Because the silverskin is tough and sinewy it is fairly easy to remove Slide the tip of your knife under a portion of it, starting at the head end, and holding your knife at an angle so that it lightly scrapes the underside of the silverskin (your blade should not be angled in towards the meat), run the blade down the length of the filet, removing the silverskin in long thin strips. When the silverskin has been completely removed, look over the whole Tenderloin and remove any stray bits of fat, sinew and silverskin that remain on the surface. When you are done, you will have a cleaned whole filet. The usable meat can be cut into the center cut filet, the thin tail and the large and oddly-shaped head. I like to use the center cut filet for roasting whole. A roasted center cut filet produces beautiful, uniformly shaped slices that are perfect for serving at formal dinners. A 5 1/2 lb. tenderloin will yield roughly a 2 lb. center cut filet.

BACK TO TOP           KOBE / WAGYU BEEF:

Japanese bred and traditionally raised Kobe Beef comes from the Wagyu Beef Steer. True Kobe Beef is NOT available anywhere in the world but in Japan - Much like the most 'favored" types of Japanese grown Rice's are not available elsewhere. In the U.S.A., the Japanese Black Wagyu cattle were crossbred with Black Angus cattle (1 Wagyu Bull and 20K Angus Cows equals instant giant beef herd). This crossbreed has been named "American Style Kobe Beef". These Steers are NOT raised in the traditional Japanese Kobe way, where they are massaged daily, fed special, secret blends of feed and slaughtered without stress. Still, ours is a very flavorful breed of Steer. This crossbreed is usually sold and served in this country under the true name of "Wagyu Beef". Sometimes, completely erroneously sold by different, unscrupulous wholesalers and restaurateurs, under the false "shortened" name of “Kobe Beef”. There is ABSOLUTELY NOTHING wrong with Wagyu Beef Meat - It is flavorful, tender, well marbled and well worth a celebration dinner with loved your ones. It is DIFFICULT to find in retail butcher shops and if you do find it, be prepared for sticker shock.

BACK TO TOP           GROUND BEEF:

The USDA has laid ground rules for the names that may be used for different types of ground beef.

GROUND BEEF: 70% Lean 30% Fat. Additional Fat may be added to reach the 30% limit. A lot of fat inside. Good flavoring for Taco's, Chili, Spaghetti, etc. where it can be drained after browning.

HAMBURGER: Same as Ground Beef, but CANNOT have any added fat - The fat content is what it is.

GROUND CHUCK: 80~85% Lean, 20~15% Fat. GREAT for hamburgers.

GROUND ROUND: 85~90% Lean, 15~10% Fat. Use in recipes where the hamburger cannot be drained after cooking. Meatloafs, etc.

GROUND SIRLOIN: 90~92% Lean, 10~8% Fat . Lowest in flavor. Good only for weight watching. Needs flavor additives or seasonings.

BACK TO TOP           GRILLING & FRYING A HAMBURGER:

To Grill a GREAT Hamburger: Divide the Ground Beef into equal sized chunks. Shape the each chunk VERY LIGHTLY into a patty. You do NOT want to pack it at all. Once it is shaped into a patty, use your thumbs to press a dent in the top that takes up at least 3/4 of the entire patty's diameter. The dent will make the patty cook up to an even height. Place the patties on the grill grate with the dent up. Grill until nicely charred. Flip each patty over and grill with the grill lid closed until done to your liking. Add Cheese, etc. during the last minute of cooking

NEVER, EVER, AT ANY TIME, PRESS ON TOP OF THE PATTY WITH YOUR SPATULA!!!!!

#1: It squeezes the fat out of the burger which causes flare-ups.

#2: It squeezes the juices out of the burger which GREATLY reduces the flavor.

#3: It stinks and smokes up the back yard.

#4: DO NOT PLAY WITH YOUR GRILLING FOOD! LEAVE IT ALONE!

BACK TO TOP           HOMEMADE HAMBURGER:

Easy and fast and if Charcoal Grilling burgers or making Meat Loaf, well worth the small effort. Making your own has a herd of plusses with the only negative being that it is not as quick as buying it already ground for you (almost though).

#1: YOU DON'T HAVE TO COOK IT UNTIL IT BECOMES SHOE LEATHER!

#2: You get to control the fat content.

#3: You get to control the bone content.

#4: You get to control the scrap meat content.

#5: The home ground texture is to die for.

For 1 pound of Hamburger, purchase an 8 Oz Chuck Roast and an 8 Oz Sirloin Steak. Cut both into 1" cubes, cutting off and discarding any large fat pieces. Place the Chuck Cubes in the Food Processor and pulse 10 times (1+ seconds per pulse). Repeat for the Sirloin Cubes.

NOTE: If making Hamburger for Chili, stop at 6 pulses. If there are any big pieces left after pulsing, discard them as they most likely contain grizzle. Lightly mix the Chuck and Sirloin together with your hands. DO NOT SQUEEZE WHILE MIXING! It is now ready to store covered in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Hamburger made fresh in this way does NOT have to be cooked well done! Medium Rare to Medium makes for a REALLY TASTY hamburger.

Make your patties exactly 5 Oz Each. Lightly shape them so they are about 4 inches in

diameter and 1/2 of an inch thick. Make a shallow dent in the top of each patty so that as

the meat puffs up during cooking, the middle and the edges of each patty end up being the same thickness when done.

Unbreakable Hamburger cooking rules to live by:

#1: NEVER EVER NEVER press on the top of the patty with your Spatula while cooking.

#2: Turn each patty over ONE TIME ONLY! About 4 minutes per side for Medium.

#3: Let the cooked patties stand undisturbed covered with an Aluminum Foil tent for 5 minutes after cooking.

#4: Add any Cheese on the top just before tenting (Add a toothpick to keep the Aluminum Foil from sticking to the Cheese).

BACK TO TOP           BROWNING MEATS:

To effectively brown ANY meat which ends up giving you that much-sought after caramelized, flavorful exterior is NOT difficult to achieve. There are only three hard rules:

#1): Brown over medium high to high heat with as little added oil as possible.

#2): Do NOT crowd the meat in the pan, if necessary, do it in small batches.

#3): Wet meat will NEVER brown, Always pat the meat dry with paper towels before beginning to cook. Blood WILL brown, moisture WILL NOT!

You always want to brown meats that are NOT touching each other in the pan. Crowding the meat causes the meat to steam itself instead of braise itself. Steamed meats are ALWAYS an unappetizing gray color. Braised meats are always GB&D! “Golden Brown and Delicious” - not to mention creating that wonderful "fond" in the bottom of the pan, just WAITING for you to quickly transform it into a multitude of wonderful pan sauces and gravies. Now you know why your ground beef for chili & spaghetti always comes out gray instead of brown.

BACK TO TOP           CORN FED VS GRASS FED BEEF:

It used to be that a steak was a steak was a steak. Today, it's not that simple. A quick glance at the butcher's counter will reveal all kinds of cuts you never knew about along with fancy breeds like Angus, Wagyu and Kobe. Then, just when you thought you came to a decision, you're faced with grass fed vs corn fed beef. Is there actually a difference between these two types of meat, other than the obvious price difference?

GRASS-FED BEEF:

Grass-fed beef is exactly what it sounds like: cattle that have grazed on grassy pastures THEIR ENTIRE LIVES. The first thing you'll notice about this type of beef is its price tag: at my local grocery store, the grass-fed ribeye steak was just shy of $4 more per pound than the corn-fed ribeye. Why is it so much more? Well, it takes longer for grass-fed cattle to reach their processing weight, and they weigh less without grain or corn to bulk up their diet. Raising beef this way is thought to be more sustainable, but it's also more expensive for the rancher. Are those extra dollars worth it? When it comes to nutrition, grass-fed beef is higher in key nutrients, including antioxidants and vitamins. It also has twice as many omega-3 fatty acids as regular beef. As far as flavor goes, this leaner beef has a slightly gamey taste. Because it has less intramuscular fat, it tends to eat a bit meatier than the corn-fed kind, too. Some people describe the texture as chewy, but it's all about how you cook it! Since it has less fat content, it tends to cook faster than regular beef and can easily overcook if you're not careful. We recommend letting grass-fed beef come to room temperature before cooking it to increase the chances of even cooking.

CORN-FED BEEF:

All cattle are started on grass as youngsters, but most of the industry finishes their beef on corn or grain. This quickly bulks the cattle up, increasing the fat to muscle ratio. While this type of diet adds a ton of flavor to your steaks, it's also sort of like feeding candy and cake to cattle; they'll eat their greens if they have to, but they also love filling up on junk food! Since these foods aren't typical feed for cattle, many feedlots end up using preventative antibiotics to keep the herd from getting sick. Most people love the flavor of corn-fed beef, with its buttery, slightly sweet flavor and a texture that most people describe as melt-in-your-mouth tender. It's also more forgiving to cook with its higher fat content. If you love the flavor of corn-fed beef but don't love the additives the cattle are given, look for beef labelled as antibiotic- and hormone-free. Whether you go grass-fed or corn-fed beef, the basic cooking principles apply. Salt it generously before cooking it, and always let your steak rest at least 15 minutes before slicing it.

BACK TO TOP 

 

 

=== JUMP TO INFORMATION (CLICK ON UNDERLINED TEXT) === -- DRY AGING BEEF -- PRIME RIB -- USDA BEEF GRADES -- BEEF TENDERLOINS -- -- KOBE / WAGYU BEEF -- GROUND BEEF -- HOMEMADE HAMBURGER MEAT -- -- GRILLING & FRYING HAMBURGER -- BROWNING MEATS -- CORN FED VS GRASS FED --
The Recipes and information contained in these pages are for private use only. They are NOT to be used commercially or published.
BEEF FACTOIDS
Creating your own cuts of meat can save you a bundle; besides, YOU get to 100% control the fat content. ALL butcher cuts of Beef can benefit greatly from being dry aged, from a common, inexpensive English Cut Roast all the way up to VERY expensive Prime Rib Roasts and Beef Tenderloins. Below are a few handy Factoids to aid you in purchasing & cooking your “perfect” Beef selections for your family meals: Dry Aging Beef, Prime Rib Roasts, USDA Beef Grades, Beef Tenderloin Roasts, Kobe / Wagyu Beef, Ground Beef, Making your own Homemade Ground Beef, Corn-Fed VS Grass-Fed Beef.
MOBILE
=== JUMP TO INFORMATION (CLICK ON UNDERLINED TEXT) === -- DRY AGING BEEF -- PRIME RIB -- USDA BEEF GRADES -- BEEF TENDERLOINS -- -- KOBE / WAGYU BEEF -- GROUND BEEF -- HOMEMADE HAMBURGER MEAT -- -- GRILLING & FRYING HAMBURGER -- BROWNING MEATS -- CORN FED VS GRASS FED --

BACK TO TOP           DRY AGING BEEF:

ALL beef is "Wet Aged" in one form or another. Primal (untrimmed) cuts are usually packed air-tight in very heavy Cryovac plastic bags by slaughter houses for shipping and storage for extended periods which "counts" only as Wet-Aging time.

The reasons to Dry-Age a quality piece of Beef are MANY.

JUST DO IT - IT WILL BE WELL WORTH THE TRIP!!!!!!

HOW TO DO IT!

Pat the untrimmed Roast dry with paper towels and place it bones down on a wire rack in a shallow pan with a paper towel in the bottom to catch any drippings (change the drippings towel DAILY). Set uncovered in the bottom (coldest) shelf of a refrigerator for 4 to 7 days. Just prior to roasting, thinly shave off any pieces of exterior meat that have become completely dehydrated (REALLY funky looking - Dried areas are perfectly OK). A 6 pound roast will lose over 1/3 pound during this most important aging process.

The meat NEEDS to be kept at a pretty constant 38 degrees during the entire dry aging process.

If you have an extra refrigerator that is not opened very often - PLEASE USE IT, constantly opening and closing a modern refrigerator causes the air-removal and defrosting processes to kick on & off every time the door opens and closes. This causes large changes in internal temperatures - BAD FOR DRY AGING.

If you absolutely CANNOT STAND the fact that there is an exposed piece of meat just sitting in your fridge, you can loosely wrap the meat in a triple layer of cheesecloth. However; DAILY, you must unwrap the cheesecloth, let it dry for 1/2 hour and then re-wrap the meat in order to keep it from sticking and tearing apart the meat fibers too much when you remove it. This piece of cheesecloth WILL get ugly before the process is completed.

BACK TO TOP           PRIME RIB: 

If you are going to spend this much money for a piece of meat, spend a little extra and get the best cut of Beef you can find.

Something called a Prime Rib Roast is the exact same thing as something called a Standing Rib Roast with the only difference being the price, which depends only upon your Butchers attitude towards you.

Coming from the Primal Rib Cut on a Beef Cow - There are two per cow (one on each side).

The Prime Rib you will "normally" cook will contain 7 Ribs. If it is cut into individual rib pieces and the rib bones removed, the cut then magically becomes a Rib-Eye Steak.

Roasting the Prime Rib whole and slicing after cooking gives you a traditional Prime Rib Dinner.

There are two different cuts for Prime Rib (unless you purchase a whole Rib - 14 Ribs).

1) THE FIRST CUT: Also called the Loin End or Small End, is the rear of the section of ribs and has leaner meat and smaller bones. This gives you more meat for your money. The meat and bones get larger as you move forward towards the front shoulder, as does the fat content.

The First Cut is the cut you want to purchase.

2) THE SHOULDER CUT: This cut is from the front of the cut, or near the Shoulder. It is the larger of the cuts with bigger sections of meat which translates into more sinew between the muscles. This cut also has more fat and larger bones.

BACK TO TOP           BEEF GRADES:

BACK TO TOP           The above chart shows the marbling used the USDA to determine the commonly available Beef grades. This chart ranges from the best flavored Beef (Moderately Abundant) to the poorest flavored Beef (Slight). PRIME BEEF: Slightly Abundant to Moderate. CHOICE BEEF: Modest to Small. SELECT BEEF: Slight to Traces (Not Pictured). STANDARD BEEF: Practically Devoid (Not Pictured). WAGYU BEEF: Abundant (Not Pictured) to Moderately Abundant. ALL cuts of Beef are actually graded by the USDA, but they physically “inspect” ONLY a Rib Eye Roast. The marbling of that one roast is used to determine the grade for all of the meat for that ENTIRE COW).

YOUR CHOICES: 

Meat retailers tend to attempt to glorify the meat they sell by giving theirs unique names (Black Angus, etc.) in order to convince their customers that theirs is better than anyone elses. Odds are it isn’t.

1) PRIME: Or Restaurant grade. Search diligently and get your wallet out - this is "THE ONE".

Less than 2% of all beef sold in this country is USDA graded as Prime.

2) CHOICE: While OK, this grade is entirely acceptable if you absolutely cannot find Prime as long as you dry age it.

3) SELECT: Pass this grade by - no matter what. While Prime and Choice Beef are ALWAYS labelled as such, Select may or may not be labelled as to it’s grade AT ALL. If the package isn't labelled as either "Prime" or "Choice", it's a given that it's therefore by default Select Grade.

4) STANDARD: This CA 1800's grade is currently non-existent since today's Cattle Meat is not forced to "toughen up" on those long, hard western cattle drives any more.

BACK TO TOP           BEEF TENDERLOINS:

While relatively low in flavor, but unbelievably tender. Again, if spending this much money, search for a Prime grade roast. If you purchase a whole Beef Tenderloin, it will most likely come in a very heavy plastic bag (Cryovac) and be untrimmed. You need to "prepare" it properly before cooking by trimming.

TRIMMING A TENDERLOIN: 

Remove the tapered Tenderloin from the bag and pat it dry with paper towels. Use your hands to pull off and discard any large pieces of loose fat. Some of the membrane will also peel easily off. As you probe the Tenderloin with your fingers you will discover that there is the main long muscle and a small sinewy, fatty piece that runs the length of the entire Tenderloin. This is called the chain and it is attached most securely at the head (the thicker end) of the Tenderloin. Force your thumb down between the two muscles and slide it end to end to separate them as much as possible before beginning to cut. The chain has some meat, but it is mostly fat and sinew. Trimming away the visible fat and sinew and then slicing the chain very thin will make you the best Philly Cheese Steak you EVER had! To release the chain from the Tenderloin, starting at the narrow end (the tail) and using the tip of your knife and make short, careful strokes between the chain and the Tenderloin. Use your free hand to pull the chain away from the Tenderloin as you cut. Until you reach the head, it should come away very easily. You should only be using your knife to cut through membrane and fat. When you reach the head, be careful about where you cut. The separation between the chain and the main Tenderloin is not so apparent at the head end. Examine the head where the chain is attached and cut the chain away being careful not to cut too much into the good meat of the Tenderloin. There will be a narrow flap of meat left alongside the head of the Tenderloin that is not part of the chain. Flip the Tenderloin over. Begin to cut away the thick chunks of fat by carefully sliding your knife along the length of the Tenderloin (again, use knife strokes that run in the head to tail direction). There is generally a big chunk of fat under the head that should be pulled away. Doing so will create a bit of a flap, but that is normal. After scraping and slicing the most apparent fat away from  the Tenderloin, there will still be some fat that is visible, but removing it would involve digging into the meat, which is not something you want to do. Turn the filet back over and remove the most apparent fat from the top of the Tenderloin. All that should be left to remove now is the long thick membrane that runs about two-thirds of the way down the Tenderloin from the head. This membrane is called the silverskin. This silverskin must be removed. When it is subjected to the heat of the oven, sauté pan or grill, it shrinks and will cause the filet to curl. It is also tough and inedible. Because the silverskin is tough and sinewy it is fairly easy to remove Slide the tip of your knife under a portion of it, starting at the head end, and holding your knife at an angle so that it lightly scrapes the underside of the silverskin (your blade should not be angled in towards the meat), run the blade down the length of the filet, removing the silverskin in long thin strips. When the silverskin has been completely removed, look over the whole Tenderloin and remove any stray bits of fat, sinew and silverskin that remain on the surface. When you are done, you will have a cleaned whole filet. The usable meat can be cut into the center cut filet, the thin tail and the large and oddly-shaped head. I like to use the center cut filet for roasting whole. A roasted center cut filet produces beautiful, uniformly shaped slices that are perfect for serving at formal dinners. A 5 1/2 lb. tenderloin will yield roughly a 2 lb. center cut filet.

BACK TO TOP           KOBE / WAGYU BEEF:

Japanese bred and traditionally raised Kobe Beef comes from the Wagyu Beef Steer. True Kobe Beef is NOT available anywhere in the world but in Japan - Much like the most 'favored" types of Japanese grown Rice's are not available elsewhere. In the U.S.A., the Japanese Black Wagyu cattle were crossbred with Black Angus cattle (1 Wagyu Bull and 20K Angus Cows equals instant giant beef herd). This crossbreed has been named "American Style Kobe Beef". These Steers are NOT raised in the traditional Japanese Kobe way, where they are massaged daily, fed special, secret blends of feed and slaughtered without stress. Still, ours is a very flavorful breed of Steer. This crossbreed is usually sold and served in this country under the true name of "Wagyu Beef". Sometimes, completely erroneously sold by different, unscrupulous wholesalers and restaurateurs, under the false "shortened" name of “Kobe Beef”. There is ABSOLUTELY NOTHING wrong with Wagyu Beef Meat - It is flavorful, tender, well marbled and well worth a celebration dinner with loved your ones. It is DIFFICULT to find in retail butcher shops and if you do find it, be prepared for sticker shock.

BACK TO TOP           GROUND BEEF:

The USDA has laid ground rules for the names that may be used for different types of ground beef.

GROUND BEEF: 70% Lean 30% Fat. Additional Fat may be added to reach the 30% limit. A lot of fat inside. Good flavoring for Taco's, Chili, Spaghetti, etc. where it can be drained after browning.

HAMBURGER: Same as Ground Beef, but CANNOT have any added fat - The fat content is what it is.

GROUND CHUCK: 80~85% Lean, 20~15% Fat. GREAT for hamburgers.

GROUND ROUND: 85~90% Lean, 15~10% Fat. Use in recipes where the hamburger cannot be drained after cooking. Meatloafs, etc.

GROUND SIRLOIN: 90~92% Lean, 10~8% Fat . Lowest in flavor. Good only for weight watching. Needs flavor additives or seasonings.

BACK TO TOP           GRILLING & FRYING A HAMBURGER:

To Grill a GREAT Hamburger: Divide the Ground Beef into equal sized chunks. Shape the each chunk VERY LIGHTLY into a patty. You do NOT want to pack it at all. Once it is shaped into a patty, use your thumbs to press a dent in the top that takes up at least 3/4 of the entire patty's diameter. The dent will make the patty cook up to an even height. Place the patties on the grill grate with the dent up. Grill until nicely charred. Flip each patty over and grill with the grill lid closed until done to your liking. Add Cheese, etc. during the last minute of cooking

NEVER, EVER, AT ANY TIME, PRESS ON TOP OF THE PATTY WITH YOUR SPATULA!!!!!

#1: It squeezes the fat out of the burger which causes flare-ups.

#2: It squeezes the juices out of the burger which GREATLY reduces the flavor.

#3: It stinks and smokes up the back yard.

#4: DO NOT PLAY WITH YOUR GRILLING FOOD! LEAVE IT ALONE!

BACK TO TOP           HOMEMADE HAMBURGER:

Easy and fast and if Charcoal Grilling burgers or making Meat Loaf, well worth the small effort. Making your own has a herd of plusses with the only negative being that it is not as quick as buying it already ground for you (almost though).

#1: YOU DON'T HAVE TO COOK IT UNTIL IT BECOMES SHOE LEATHER!

#2: You get to control the fat content.

#3: You get to control the bone content.

#4: You get to control the scrap meat content.

#5: The home ground texture is to die for.

For 1 pound of Hamburger, purchase an 8 Oz Chuck Roast and an 8 Oz Sirloin Steak. Cut both into 1" cubes, cutting off and discarding any large fat pieces. Place the Chuck Cubes in the Food Processor and pulse 10 times (1+ seconds per pulse). Repeat for the Sirloin Cubes.

NOTE: If making Hamburger for Chili, stop at 6 pulses. If there are any big pieces left after pulsing, discard them as they most likely contain grizzle. Lightly mix the Chuck and Sirloin together with your hands. DO NOT SQUEEZE WHILE MIXING! It is now ready to store covered in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Hamburger made fresh in this way does NOT have to be cooked well done! Medium Rare to Medium makes for a REALLY TASTY hamburger.

Make your patties exactly 5 Oz Each. Lightly shape them so they are about 4 inches in

diameter and 1/2 of an inch thick. Make a shallow dent in the top of each patty so that as

the meat puffs up during cooking, the middle and the edges of each patty end up being the same thickness when done.

Unbreakable Hamburger cooking rules to live by:

#1: NEVER EVER NEVER press on the top of the patty with your Spatula while cooking.

#2: Turn each patty over ONE TIME ONLY! About 4 minutes per side for Medium.

#3: Let the cooked patties stand undisturbed covered with an Aluminum Foil tent for 5 minutes after cooking.

#4: Add any Cheese on the top just before tenting (Add a toothpick to keep the Aluminum Foil from sticking to the Cheese).

BACK TO TOP           BROWNING MEATS:

To effectively brown ANY meat which ends up giving you that much- sought after caramelized, flavorful exterior is NOT difficult to achieve. There are only three hard rules:

#1): Brown over medium high to high heat with as little added oil as possible.

#2): Do NOT crowd the meat in the pan, if necessary, do it in small batches.

#3): Wet meat will NEVER brown, Always pat the meat dry with paper towels before beginning to cook. Blood WILL brown, moisture WILL NOT!

You always want to brown meats that are NOT touching each other in the pan. Crowding the meat causes the meat to steam itself instead of braise itself. Steamed meats are ALWAYS an unappetizing gray color. Braised meats are always GB&D! “Golden Brown and Delicious” - not to mention creating that wonderful "fond" in the bottom of the pan, just WAITING for you to quickly transform it into a multitude of wonderful pan sauces and gravies. Now you know why your ground beef for chili & spaghetti always comes out gray instead of brown.

BACK TO TOP           CORN FED VS GRASS FED BEEF:

It used to be that a steak was a steak was a steak. Today, it's not that simple. A quick glance at the butcher's counter will reveal all kinds of cuts you never knew about along with fancy breeds like Angus, Wagyu and Kobe. Then, just when you thought you came to a decision, you're faced with grass fed vs corn fed beef. Is there actually a difference between these two types of meat, other than the obvious price difference?

GRASS-FED BEEF:

Grass-fed beef is exactly what it sounds like: cattle that have grazed on grassy pastures THEIR ENTIRE LIVES. The first thing you'll notice about this type of beef is its price tag: at my local grocery store, the grass-fed ribeye steak was just shy of $4 more per pound than the corn-fed ribeye. Why is it so much more? Well, it takes longer for grass-fed cattle to reach their processing weight, and they weigh less without grain or corn to bulk up their diet. Raising beef this way is thought to be more sustainable, but it's also more expensive for the rancher. Are those extra dollars worth it? When it comes to nutrition, grass-fed beef is higher in key nutrients, including antioxidants and vitamins. It also has twice as many omega-3 fatty acids as regular beef. As far as flavor goes, this leaner beef has a slightly gamey taste. Because it has less intramuscular fat, it tends to eat a bit meatier than the corn-fed kind, too. Some people describe the texture as chewy, but it's all about how you cook it! Since it has less fat content, it tends to cook faster than regular beef and can easily overcook if you're not careful. We recommend letting grass-fed beef come to room temperature before cooking it to increase the chances of even cooking.

CORN-FED BEEF:

All cattle are started on grass as youngsters, but most of the industry finishes their beef on corn or grain. This quickly bulks the cattle up, increasing the fat to muscle ratio. While this type of diet adds a ton of flavor to your steaks, it's also sort of like feeding candy and cake to cattle; they'll eat their greens if they have to, but they also love filling up on junk food! Since these foods aren't typical feed for cattle, many feedlots end up using preventative antibiotics to keep the herd from getting sick. Most people love the flavor of corn-fed beef, with its buttery, slightly sweet flavor and a texture that most people describe as melt-in-your-mouth tender. It's also more forgiving to cook with its higher fat content. If you love the flavor of corn-fed beef but don't love the additives the cattle are given, look for beef labelled as antibiotic- and hormone-free. Whether you go grass-fed or corn-fed beef, the basic cooking principles apply. Salt it generously before cooking it, and always let your steak rest at least 15 minutes before slicing it.

BACK TO TOP

 

 

The Recipes and information contained in these pages are for private use only. They are NOT to be used commercially or published.